Speech Topics Archive

From the 1990s onward, we present a history of Speech categories whose topics change annually.

Moments in History

  1. The Decade of the 1960s
  2. The Decade of the 1920s
  3. Westward Movement in America – 1840-1880s
  4. World War I (1914-1918) and/or World War II (1939-1945)
  5. The Colonial Era:  1492-1750
  6. The Decade of the 1970s
  7. The Decade of the 1950s
  8. The Turn of the Century:  1890-1910
  9. The Decade of the 1940s
  10. The Decade of the 1990s Stepping Stone to the Millennium
  11. The High Medieval Period, 800-1300 – Charlemagne to the Black Death
  12. The World in Transition 1830-1850
  13. The Decade of the 1930s
  14. 100 B.C. to 1 A.D.:  Movement from Republic to Empire
  15. 1880-1900:  Frontier Era to Industrial Age
  16. 1770-1800: The Age of Revolution
  17. The Decade of the 1920s
  18. 1450-1650 – Reformation, Age of Discovery and High Renaissance
  19. The Decade of the 1980s
  20. The Decade of 1850-1880
  21. The Decade of the 1960s
  22. 1901-1913 Turn of the Century to the Eve of the Great War
  23. The Decade of the 1970s
  24. 1700-1750
  25. 1940s or 1450-1650
  26. 1990s or 1750-1800
  27. 1801-1840 and/or 1930’s

Public Address

1991

  1. Homeless: Subdistrict/district:  What services, if any, should the Federal Government provide for the homeless?  State:  What services, if any, should local governments provide for the homeless?
  2. Indian Treaty Rights: Subdistrict/district:  What effect, if any, do Indian Treaty Rights have on the State of Wisconsin?  State:  What organization(s) or group(s), if any, should respond to the conflicts surrounding the Indian Rights Treaty issues?
  3. A United Germany: Subdistrict/district:  What, if any, are the international economic implications of a united Germany?  State:  What, if any, are the international political ramifications of a united Germany?
  4. Drinking Age: Subdistrict/district:  What has been the impact, if any, of Wisconsin’s raising the drinking age to 21?  State: What modification, if any, should be made to Wisconsin’s drinking age law?

1992

  1. Global Warming: Subdistrict/district:  What evidence, if any, supports the theory of a global warming trend?  State:  What effect, if any, would a global warming trend have upon humans?
  2. Euthanasia: Subdistrict/district:  To what extent, if any, should U.S. law allow terminally ill patients to end their own lives?  State:  To what extent, if any, should U.S. law allow the medical profession to assist terminally ill patients to end their own lives?
  3. War Reconstruction:  Subdistrict/district:  To what extent, if any, is the U.S. responsible for rebuilding Iraq infrastructure after the Persian Gulf War?  State:  To what extent, if any, is the U.S. responsible for rebuilding Iraq’s economy after the Persian Gulf War?

1993

  1. National Healthcare:  Subdistrict/district:  To what extent, if any, are the costs of healthcare preventing Americans from receiving care?  State:  What evidence exists, if any, that the federal government should develop a national health care plan?
  2. Sexual Harassment:  Subdistrict/district:  What effect, if any, does the current understanding of what constitutes sexual harassment have on our society? State:  What, if anything, should be done to reduce sexual harassment?
  3. American Education System:  Subdistrict/district:  What evidence exists, if any, that American secondary schools are adequately preparing students with immediate employability skills?  State:  What evidence exists, if any, that American secondary schools are adequately preparing students for post-secondary education?

1994

  1. Constitutional Rights – To what extent, if any, should First Amendment rights be limited and/or monitored?
  2. Global Issues – What, if any, involvement should the United States have in controversies in other parts of the world?
  3. Poverty – To what extent, if any, does poverty affect children?

1995

  1. Education – What actions, if any, should be taken to maintain extracurricular activities in a time of growing economic stress?
  2. Individual Rights – What actions, if any, should be taken by the government to ensure an individual’s right to privacy?  (Possible areas may include but are not limited to:  elected officials, sports figures, entertainment figures, rape victims, gay/lesbian, adoptee, family medical history need.)
  3. Juvenile Justice – To what extent, if any, should current laws on punishment of juvenile offenders by changed?

1996

  1. AIDS – To what extent, if any, should the federal government increase its funding of AIDS research?
  2. Cyberspace – What, if anything, should be done to discourage or eliminate the irresponsible use of electronic information networks?
  3. Social Security – What actions, if any, should be taken to protect and preserve the solvency of Social Security?

1997

  1. Campaign Financing – To what extent, if any, are candidates buying public office rather than truly being elected to public office?  (PACs, lobbyists, special interest groups)
  2. Balancing the Federal Budget – What, if any, are the social/economic consequences of balancing the federal budget?
  3. Gender Equity – To what extent, if any, is gender bias/gender equity a real and pervasive problem America?

1998

  1. Marijuana – What, if any, are the consequences of legalization of marijuana?
  2. Official Language – What, if any, is the need for the designation of an official language in the United States?
  3. Capital Punishment – To what extent, if any, should capital punishment be uniform and consistent throughout all fifty states?

1999

  1. Affirmative Action – What should be done to protect the practice of affirmative action, or should affirmative action, as a national standard, be repealed?
  2. Guns/Violence in Schools – What can be done to stem the growing problem of violence in schools?
  3. Volunteerism – What actions, if any, should be taken to encourage volunteerism?

2000

  1. Animal Rights/Vivisection – To what extent, if any, should animals be used for medical research and/or product testing?
  2. Product Liability – To what extent, if any, should manufacturers be held responsible for crimes and/or injuries resulting from the use of their product?
  3. Role Models – To what extent, if any, should professional entertainers and athletes be looked upon or expected to be positive role models?

2001

  1. Voting – What should be done to increase voter participation in U.S. elections?
  2. School Security – What should school and law enforcement officials do to improve safety and security in our nation’s schools?
  3. U.S. Foreign Policy – To what extent, if any, should the United States assume the role of policing the world?
  4. Gun Control – Is the Second Amendment of the United States Constitution an outdated institution or one of the foundations of our freedom?

2002

  1. The Electoral College – Is the Electoral College an outdated institution?
  2. Students Rights – To what extent, if any, should school and law enforcement officials be allowed to search student lockers, vehicles, backpacks and possessions?
  3. Multicultural Awareness – What, if anything, should be done to promote cultural awareness in America’s schools?
  4. Juvenile Justice – Under what conditions, if any, should alleged juvenile offenders be waived into adult courts?

2003

  1. The Environment – To what extent, if any, should the extraction of natural resources be carried out in ecologically sensitive areas including, but not limited to, such places as rain forests, nature preserves and parks?
  2. Family Farms – What can or should be done to preserve the tradition of family farms?
  3. Immigration – In light of the September 11, 2001 attacks, to what extent, if any, should the Federal Government restrict and monitor immigration into the United States?
  4. Zero Tolerance – To what extent, if any, are zero tolerance weapons policies effective in schools?

2004

  1. Health Care – To what extent, if any, is there a need to implement changes in health care in the United States?
  2. Individual Rights – To what extent, if any, should individuals residing in the United States be expected to sacrifice certain freedoms and individual rights during a time of national emergency?
  3. Standardized Tests – To what extent, if any, are standardized tests a means to measure teaching and learning?
  4. Lawsuits – What impact, if any, has the prevalence of lawsuits had on the sense of personal responsibility in American society?

2005

  1. Alternative Energy – To what extent, if any, is there a need for research on and use of alternative energy sources?
  2. Mascots and Nicknames – Should sports teams in the U.S. be required to end the use of ethnic nicknames and/or symbolic mascots?
  3. Childhood Obesity – Under what circumstances, if any, should governments (local, state, national) enforce policies that help to decrease the rate of obesity in children?
  4. Performance Enhancing Drugs – To what extent, if any, should performance enhancing drugs and supplements be regulated?

2006

  1. Cheating in Schools – What, if anything, should be done to address the problem of cheating in our nation’s schools?
  2. Poverty in Developing Nations – To what extent, if any, should industrialized nations help alleviate poverty in developing nations?
  3. Extracurricular Programs – What, if anything, should be done to protect extracurricular programs in our high schools?
  4. Release of Sex Offenders – To what extent, if any, are current practices regarding release of sex offenders providing protection to American society?

2007

  1. The Right to Die – Under what circumstances should a person have the right to terminate his or her own life?
  2. Tuition – What effect, if any, is the rising cost of tuition having on access to higher education?
  3. Cell Phone Use – To what extent, if any, should cell phone use be regulated?
  4. Global Warming – What impact, if any, does global warming have on the environment?

2008

  1. Working Teens – What impact, if any, does teen employment during the school year have on academic performance and co-curricular participation?
  2. NASA – To what extent, if any, should the federal government continue to fund NASA?
  3. Presidency – What qualities have made  past presidents successful?
  4. Downloading Music and MP3 File Sharing – To what extent, if any, should consumers be able to download and engage in MP3 file sharing without compensating the recording artists and record companies?

2009

  1. Internet Regulation – To what extent, if any, should content on the World Wide Web be regulated?
  2. China – What impact did the 2008 Olympics have on the Chinese culturally, economically and/or politically?
  3. Origin of Human Life – What should public schools be required to teach with regard to the origin of human life?
  4. Human Trafficking – What, if anything, should be done to address the worldwide problem of human trafficking?

2010

  1. Same-Sex Marriage – To what extent, if any, should state and federal government recognize same sex marriage and/or civil unions?
  2. Vegetarian/Vegan Diet – What are the benefits, of any, to a vegetarian and/or vegan diet?
  3. Obama Presidency – To what extent, if any, has the first year of the Obama Presidency been a success or failure?
  4. Social Networking – To what extent, if any, will social networking shape the future?
  5. Drinking – What, if anything, should be done to discourage the drinking culture in Wisconsin?

2011

  1. Sex Education – What sex education, if any, should be taught in public schools?
  2. Stem Cell Research – What are the potential benefits or harms, if any, of embryonic stem cell research?
  3. Textbooks – To what extent, if any, should special interest groups (such as the state school boards of Texas or California) influence public school textbook content across the country?
  4. 24/7 News Cycle – To what extent, if any, does the immediacy of the 24/7 news cycle (cable news, twitter, Facebook, RSS feeds, blogs) help or hinder the public’s ability to understand the complexity of current events?

2012

  1. Terrorism – To what extent, if any, has recent US Military involvement made the world a safer place?
  2. Nuclear Power – In light of the nuclear disaster in Japan, what, if any, should be the future of nuclear power in the United States?
  3. Fine Arts Programming – Given the current state budget crisis, to what extent, if any, should Wisconsin public schools continue to fund fine arts classes?
  4. Online and/or Charter Schools – What should be the role of on-line and/or charter schools in public education?

2013

  1. Sports Related Head Injuries:  What, if anything, can/should be done to reduce concussions and brain injuries caused by sports/athletic participation?
  2. Political Partisanship:  What, if anything, should be done to reduce the level of partisanship in state and national government?
  3. Great Lakes:  To what extent, if any, should the Great Lakes Commission consider the sale or sharing of water with other parts of the continent?    
  4. The Draft:  To what extent, if any, should a military draft be re-instituted by the U.S. government?

2014

  1. Cyberbullying – What, if anything, should be done to reduce cyberbullying?
  2. Working Conditions – What, if anything, can be done to improve working conditions and wages?
  3. Legalization of Marijuana – To what extent, if any, in light of other states’ actions, should Wisconsin act on legalization of marijuana?
  4. Private School Vouchers – To what extent, if any, should public money be used to provide vouchers for private school tuition?

2015

  1. New Food Regulations in Public School Systems: To what extent, if any, should state and federal government regulate the food students consume during the school day?
  2. Health Care:  To what extent, if any, has the Affordable Care Act been successful?
  3. Cheating:  What, if anything, can be done to curb cheating in schools?
  4. Digital Footprint:  Under what circumstances, if any, should one’s digital footprint (Social Media) be used by evaluators to determine one’s access to future endeavors such as job opportunities, college entrance, and/or scholarships?

2016

  1. State Parks: To what extent, if any, is the defunding and privatization of state parks affecting resource management?
  2. Technology Reliance: To what extent, if any, is reliance on technology affecting our ability to learn and retain knowledge?
  3. Youth Sports: To what extent, if any, does participation in youth sports affect mental and physical well-being?
  4. Racial Tensions: To what extent, if any, is the media elevating racial tensions in the U.S.?

2017

  1. Post-secondary education accessibility: What, if anything, should be done to reduce costs for post-secondary education?
  2. Transgendered students: To what extent, if any, should public schools recognize the rights of transgendered individuals?
  3. Gun violence: What, if anything, should government do to address gun violence?
  4. Presidential priorities: What should be the new U.S. President’s top three priorities?
  5. Electoral College: To what extent, if any, is the Electoral College an outdated way of electing the U.S. President?

2018

  1. How involved should parents be in their child’s education?
  2. To what extent, if any, does immigration affect employment
  3. What, if anything, can be done to eliminate food deserts in America
  4. To what extent, if any, are prisons in the US effective?
  5. To what degree, if any, should space exploration continue?

 

Special Occasion

1991

  1. Public Support Speech: As a member of an environmental group you are asked to address a local civic group challenging them to become involved in a recycling program.
  2. Entertainment Speech: As a member of the award committee, you are responsible for presenting the humorous awards at the forensics banquet.
  3. Keynote Address: As a high school representative, you are to address your elementary school’s “Just Say No” club.
  4. Goodwill Speech: As an organ recipient, you are asked to address a high school assembly to encourage the significance of signing the anatomical gift statement on your driver’s license.
  5. Welcoming Speech: Imagine that anyone from history would come to speak at your commencement; as the president of the Senior Class you will give the welcome speech for the historical figure who will speak.

1992

  1. Acceptance of an award: You are the recipient of a scholarship from a special interest group.  You must present your acceptance speech at their annual meeting.
  2. Dedication: You have been asked to present the dedication speech at the opening of a new outdoor facility in the community.
  3. Speech to entertain: You have been chosen to give a humorous farewell speech to one of the following: classmates, teachers, family, co-workers.
  4. Speech of a proposal: As a student lobbyist you are to address the school board on an issue of current interest or need in your school district.
  5. Eulogy: You have been chosen to deliver a speech honoring an individual in the area of arts and entertainment who has made a significant difference in our culture.

1993

  1. The campaign speech: You are running for a political office on the national, state or local level.  You wish to gain the citizens’ support for the upcoming elections.
  2. Dedication: You have been selected to present an artistic masterpiece to a public facility.
  3. Keynote: You have been chosen to promote a public safety issue to the elementary, middle or high school community.
  4. The occasion may vary: You are a high school student representing the US in a foreign country.  This could be a team participant, presenter or recipient of an award, or a foreign exchange student. (The occasion may vary – dinner meeting, school event, performing event.)
  5. Entertainment: You have been chosen as the humorous speaker at your high school reunion.

1994

  1. Patriot tribute: You have been chosen to give a speech commemorating someone who has died in service to their country.  (War, FBI, space exploration, etc.)
  2. Public apology: You are in a position that requires you to make a public apology for a wrongdoing. You must successfully place your organization in good standing with the public. (Political blunder, racial injustice, or financial embezzlement)
  3. Farewell speech: You are at a dinner in your honor.  You must say farewell to a group of people that you are leaving due to an employment change or relocation to another state or country.
  4. Award acceptance: You have been given an award for outstanding contributions to your school or community.  (Writing award, student council, bravery, junior leadership, scholarship, etc.)
  5. Anniversary celebration: You have been chosen to speak at your parents or grandparents wedding anniversary (silver, ruby or golden).  You must address the importance of the family.

1995

  1. Speech to Entertain: You have been chosen to “roast” a former classmate who has become famous (professional singer, actor or politician) as she/he moves up in her/his career.
  2. Eulogy: You have been chosen to deliver a speech honoring a deceased classmate, teacher or other respected school personnel.
  3. Career Opportunity Speech: You are a college or technical college recruiter making a speech about future educational needs and job prospects to a high school junior class.
  4. Speech of Encouragement: As a representative of the Student Council, you have been asked to encourage student participation in “the arts” and other non-athletic school activities.
  5. Fundraising Speech: As a representative of the school student body, you have received permission to address the local city council to propose funding for a new program, project or facility, which would benefit both the school and community.

1996

  1. Dedication: You have been asked to present the dedication speech at the opening of an educational facility (gym, pool, theatre, etc.) donated by your family.
  2. Entertainment: At the family reunion you were chosen to entertain the teenage relatives with your humorous memories of younger days.
  3. Campaign Speech: You are a presidential candidate in the 1996 election.  Convince the young voters (18-25) of the impact of their votes on the upcoming issues.
  4. Keynote-Educational Address: As a student in your high school, you will address the PTO or parent group concerning one or more serious/potential problem(s) in your district.  (Problems may include, but are not limited to, eating disorders, drug use, gangs, and activities for youth, etc.)
  5. Commencement Address: You have achieved your career goals and your success has prompted an invitation to be the guest speaker at your alma mater’s graduation ceremony.
  6. Commemorative Speech: You will address the 100th Anniversary Banquet of the Wisconsin High School Forensic Association.  Possible inclusions are:  some history of the organization, famous past participants, merits and educational value of WHSFA, etc.

1997

  1. Goodwill Speech: As an organ recipient, you are asked to address a high school assembly regarding the significance of signing the anatomical gift statement on the back of the driver’s license.
  2. Anniversary Speech: Imagine that anyone from history could come and speak at a city’s centennial.  Who would that person be and what would the message be?
  3. Eulogy: You have been chosen to deliver a speech honoring an individual in the area of arts and entertainment who has made a significant difference in our culture.
  4. Keynote Speaker: You have been chosen to promote a public safety issue to the elementary, middle school, and/or high school community.
  5. Dinner Speech: You are a high school student who has represented your country as a foreign exchange student.  You are giving a speech at a dinner given in your honor by the organization that sponsored your trip.

1998

  1. Commemorative Wisconsin Sesquicentennial Speech: You have been asked to make an address at a sesquicentennial event for the state of Wisconsin.
  2. Thank You Speech: You are receiving a college tuition scholarship from an ethnic organization of which you, your parents, and your immigrant grandparents are members.  You have been asked to make a speech accepting your award at the group’s spring luncheon.
  3. Campaign Speech: You are doing campaign work for a local School Board candidate.  You have been asked to address seniors in your school who are eligible to vote in the upcoming election.
  4. Introductory Speech: Your grandfather received the Military’s Bronze Star for his performance as a WW II infantryman.  You are introducing him to an honors history class, which is studying the war.
  5. Docent Speech: Your house has been selected by a local historical group as a part of a tour of homes in your neighborhood, which features distinctive architecture.  You have been asked to give tour participants details of your home, its personal history and the era in which it was built.

1999

  1. Docent Speech: A major art museum has selected you to conduct tours for secondary students as a retrospective exhibition of an important artist.  You have been asked to relate the artist and his/her work to other curriculum areas such as English or Social Studies.
  2. Fundraising/Assistance: As a representative of a group of individuals stricken by a major disease or genetic condition, you speak before a congressional committee requesting more money for research and/or policy changes to assist your group.
  3. Dedication: You have been asked to represent an environmental group at the rededication of a wildlife preserve or Government Park as it is being renamed to reflect the concerns of a major environmentalist.  You will describe this environmentalist, his or her work and why the area is being dedicated to his or her accomplishments.
  4. Memorial: It is the anniversary of a disaster, which has claimed the lives of many individuals. You have been asked to speak at a memorial service in their honor and place the tragedy in perspective.
  5. Apology: As a representative of a sports team, you have been asked to appear before the media and present an apology for an inappropriate or unpopular action by the team, one or more of its members or one or more of its fans.

2000

  1. Millennium Tribute: At a local elementary school you have been asked to participate in a tribute to a significant personality of the past millennium.  You will present a speech on the achievements and contributions of this individual at a school assembly.
  2. Keynote Speech: You have been chosen to be the keynote speaker at the 2000 presidential nominating convention of your political party.  Party leaders have asked you to reflect upon the party’s accomplishments during the past century, as well as upon its future goals.
  3. Introductory Speech: You have been chosen as the new instructional technology director of your school district.  The superintendent of schools has asked you to speak to a staff luncheon, outlining your goals for bringing your district’s technology into the 21st century.
  4. Groundbreaking Speech: Your community has decided to develop materials for, and construct a museum commemorating a musical group, a type of music or a musical instrument.  As you speak at its groundbreaking, you hope to describe the significance of such a facility.
  5. Awareness Campaign: You have been asked to speak to a local civic group on the benefits of alternative medicine.  Your goal is to illustrate its value.

2001

  1. Entertainment Speech: You have been chosen to “roast” a former classmate who has become famous.
  2. Eulogy: You have been chosen to deliver a speech honoring a deceased individual who has made a significant difference in our culture in the area of arts and entertainment.
  3. Keynote Speech: You have been selected to provide the keynote speech at a national academic competition for students in grades 6 through 12.  Your goal is to inspire the students to do their best in competition.
  4. Trade Show Presentation: Your employer has selected you to present a new product, service or design to prospective retailers at a major trade show.
  5. Welcome Speech: It is the year 2025, and we have discovered life on other planets.  You have been chosen, as a representative of earth, to welcome the aliens to membership in the United Nations.

2002

  1. Advocacy Speech – Organs: As an organ recipient, you are asked to address a high school assembly regarding the significance of signing the anatomical gift statement or of placing the organ donor sticker on the driver’s license.
  2. Foreign Exchange Travelogue: You are a high school student who has represented your country as a foreign exchange student.  When you return home, you deliver a speech to your sponsors describing your trip.
  3. Educator Appreciation: You have been chosen to prepare and deliver a speech at Honors Night paying tribute to a classmate, teacher or other respected school employee.
  4. Advocacy Speech – Space: You have just returned from an exploratory space mission.  You are asked to show how scientific exploration is vital to the world’s survival.
  5. Commemoration: You have been asked to address your fellow students commemorating Patriots Day – April 19th – to remind them of the American Revolution and sacrifices endured by our Forefathers.

2003

  1. Acceptance Speech: You accept a local civic group’s “Youth of the Year” award at their banquet, and explain the value of volunteer work.
  2. Entertainment: As senior class president, it is your job to “roast” some popular, retiring faculty members who are guests at the Senior Night Banquet.
  3. Eulogy: You have been asked to deliver the eulogy for a disgraced family member at his/her funeral.
  4. Graduation Speech: You have been chosen by your classmates to deliver an address at the graduation ceremony.  Your goal is to inspire them to face their future challenges.
  5. School Board Meeting: You present a speech at your local school board meeting against a proposal by the board to eliminate your school’s fine arts programs to help balance the district budget.

2004

  1. Commemoration: In honor of the 40th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Washington D.C. delivery of the “I Have A Dream” speech, you have been asked to address your student body on how far race relations have come since then, and where our nation has yet to go.
  2. Tribute – Influential Woman: You have been asked to make a tribute to an influential contemporary woman as one of your school’s Women’s History Month activities.
  3. Tribute – Veterans: Your school has selected you as the representative to pay tribute to graduates distinguished by their military service in the war in Iraq/Middle East.
  4. Anniversary Celebration: Your family has selected you to honor your parents or grandparents’ wedding anniversary at their celebration.
  5. Farewell Address: As an elected official, who has been defeated in the last election, you must address your elected colleagues before leaving office.

2005

  1. Career Keynote: You have been selected to deliver the keynote speech at a seminar for students interested in careers in technology.
  2. Historic Presidential Eulogy: Your local historical association has asked you to eulogize a President of the United States to a group of local students.
  3. Entertainment: You have been chosen as the humorous speaker at your high school reunion.
  4. Docent Speech: You have been selected by your local art museum to dedicate a new exhibit area of contemporary art in honor of a local patron of the museum.
  5. Encouragement: You have been asked to address your fellow students who have successfully worked through a difficult situation.

Beginning in 2006, and for most years afterwards, we offered general situations without context. 2006

  1. Acceptance of a Gift of Award
  2. Speech of Farewell
  3. After Dinner Speech
  4. Tribute
  5. Public Apology

2007

  1. Speech of Welcome
  2. Acceptance of Nomination or Office
  3. Sales/Fundraising Presentation
  4. Patriotic Speech

2008

  1. Presentation of a Gift or Award
  2. Speech of Protest
  3. Speech to an At-Risk Group
  4. Graduation Speech

2009

  1. Speech to Gain Good Will
  2. A “Roast” Speech
  3. A Nomination Speech
  4. A Wedding or Anniversary Speech

2010

  1. Eulogy:  A Eulogy for a pet
  2. Public Statement:  Present a public statement for a family crisis.  May include but not limited to:  a victim of a natural disaster, crime victim, illness, loss of home, etc.
  3. Trial:  An original summation of an actual or fictitious trial.
  4. Tribute:  A tribute to a teacher.

2011

  1. After Dinner Speech at a Civic Organization
  2. Announcement of a New Product
  3. Presentation of a Proposal to a Service Organization
  4. Motivational Speech to Elementary School students

2012

  1. Docent Presentation:  You have volunteered to act as a docent at your local library or museum for a special event (i.e. Youth Art Month, visiting exhibit, etc.)
  2. State Government Testimony:  You are to speak before a Wisconsin Governmental regulatory agency concerning a policy.
  3. Initiative Presentation:  You are to present your school’s “Go Green” initiative to a local organization.
  4. History Day:  You are to analyze a significant speech at a history day event. The presentation must include excerpts from the speech within your analysis.
  5. Graduation Speech:  You have been elected to present a speech at the class of 2012’s graduation.

2013

  1. Book Talk: You are to present a book talk on at least two books for younger students to the local book club or local library for a summer reading program.
  2. Wedding Speech: You, as maid of honor or best man, are to speak at your sibling’s wedding.
  3. Foreign Exchange: You are to present a speech at a local organization about your recent experience as a foreign exchange student.
  4. School Board Testimony: You are to address your local school board concerning a school policy students want to change.

2014

  1. A speech at a family reunion.
  2. An acceptance of an award or honor.
  3. A rededication of an old cemetery.
  4. A speech at the closing of a neighborhood school.

2015

  1. A speech in honor of a retiree.
  2. A speech of protest.
  3. A speech of apology.
  4. A speech to foreign visitors.

2016

  1. A speech at a charity event.
  2. A speech to the United Nations.
  3. A speech at a self-help seminar.
  4. A political victory or concession speech.

2017

  1. A speech to a veteran’s organization.
  2. A speech in response to a scandal.
  3. A sales pitch to investors for a new product or invention.
  4. A dedication of an art exhibit or public art installation.

2018

  1. Resignation speech
  2. Hall of fame induction speech
  3. Pep talk from a coach
  4. Tribute to the life of an ancestor

Storytelling

1991 – Earlier – draw category 1992 – (#1-3 = Subdistrict/District; #4-6 = State)

  1. Ghosts
  2. Science Fiction
  3. Tales of the Sea
  4. Fables
  5. Animals
  6. Stores from Other (Non-European) Lands

1993 – (#1-3 = Subdistrict/District; #4-6 = State)

  1. Husbands and Wives
  2. Trickery/Deceit
  3. Myths
  4. Growing Up/Childhood
  5. Magic and Magicians
  6. Stores from Other (European) Lands

1994

  1. Kings and Queens
  2. True Stories
  3. Myths, Fables or Folk Tales from Native American Culture
  4. Journeys/Quests
  5. Fairy Tales

1995

  1. Larger than life (giants, monsters, something larger size than normal)
  2. Mysteries
  3. Elements in Nature (wind, moon, flood, etc.)
  4. Fractured Fairy Tales (variations, spoofs or contemporization of standard fairy tales)
  5. African Tale

1996

  1. Stories of Inanimate Objects That Come to Life
  2. Stories That Are Titled With First Names (male or female; i.e., Cinderella, Hansel and Gretel, Kenny and His Kite)
  3. Good Deed Stories
  4. East Asian Stories (East Asia is defined as the area East of the Ural Mountains and West of Hawaii)
  5. Magic and Magicians

1997

  1. American Folktales
  2. Stories That Have a Moral
  3. Stories With The Color Red
  4. Stories From Scandinavia
  5. Favorite Childhood Story

1998

  1. A Story About Wisconsin
  2. A Story About Outer Space
  3. A Greek or Roman Myth
  4. A Snow Story
  5. A Non-fictional Story About a Famous Person

1999

  1. A Circus Story
  2. A Story From Japan
  3. A Story About Transportation
  4. A Story About the Old West
  5. A Ghost Story

2000

  1. An Animal Story
  2. An African Folktale
  3. A Sun, Moon and/or Star Story
  4. A Sports Story
  5. A Music Story

2001

  1. A Story Involving Water
  2. A Story With The Theme of Courage
  3. A Story From Native American Culture
  4. A Mystery Story
  5. A Story About Royalty

2002

  1. A Story From Irish Culture
  2. A Story From Greek or Roman Mythology
  3. A Forest Story
  4. A Monster Story
  5. A Holiday Story

2003

  1. A Story About Clothing
  2. A Story About An Invention
  3. A Story From Latin/South American Culture
  4. A Story With Magic and/or Magicians
  5. A Story That Has a Moral

2004

  1. A Story from Eastern Europe
  2. A Story of Leadership
  3. A Story About a Struggle Against Nature
  4. A Story of Beauty of the Lack Thereof
  5. A Story About Food

2005

  1. A Story from the Middle East
  2. A Story About Siblings
  3. A Story With A Wish
  4. A Story About Greed
  5. A Story With A Quest or Journey

2006

  1. A Story About Creatures of the Seas or Skies
  2. A Story of Birth or Death
  3. A Story of Elders, Sages, or Mentors
  4. A Story With A Surprise
  5. An Urban Legend

2007

  1. American South
  2. How or Why Story
  3. Story of Rumor, Gossip, Exaggeration
  4. Brother Grimm Story
  5. A Story Involving Gold

2008

  1. Native American Story
  2. Fractured Fairy Tale
  3. Scary Story
  4. True Story
  5. Story of Rivalry

2009

  1. Hans Christian Anderson Story
  2. A Story with Numbers
  3. A Story with Poverty or Hardship
  4. A Music Story
  5. A Chinese Folktale

2010

  1. Arabian Nights Story
  2. Childhood Story
  3. Animal Story
  4. A Story About Teamwork

2011

  1. A Story with Fantastical Creatures
  2. A Story from India
  3. A Story about Luck
  4. A Story with Insects

2012

  1. A Story from American heartland
  2. A Story about a fool
  3. A Story with puns or other word play
  4. A Story about overcoming heartbreak or sadness

2013

  1. A story from Greek or Roman mythology
  2. A story involving a ghost
  3. A war or military story
  4. A story involving trickery or deceit

2014

  1. A story from or about Africa
  2. A story about a game, contest or competition
  3. A story about mismatched or unlikely love
  4. A story about coming of age

2015

  1. A story about a party or celebration
  2. A story of justice or injustice
  3. A story incorporating Wisconsin history
  4. A story to tell around a campfire

2016

  1. A story about a holiday
  2. A Latin American story
  3. A story about a quest
  4. A story about a force of nature

2017

  1. A story from Scandanavia
  2. A story about food
  3. A story about overcoming obstacles
  4. A story about technology

2018

  1. Story about outer space
  2. Story from an indigenous culture
  3. Story about about something lost and/or found
  4. Nautical story